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Bob Tufts


Bob Tufts is a former major league baseball player with a degree in Economics from Princeton University, an MBA in Finance from Columbia University School of Business and over twenty years of experience working on Wall Street. He is currently an adjunct professor at New York University, Yeshiva University and Manhattanville College, where he teaches economics and sports themed courses.

Bob was diagnosed with multiple myeloma in 2009. After treatment with revlimid and dexamethasone, he had an autologous stem cell transplant in October 2009. He was prescribed revlimid at maintenance dosage levels in March of 2010 and has experienced no recurrence of cancer in the past four plus years.



Nov
03
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November 2nd will mark my 60th birthday -- and also mark the sixth anniversary of my return home after undergoing an autologous stem cell transplant to deal with cancer.
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Aug
19
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In his July 31 blog, "Drugs and Dollars," David Blumenthal, president of The Commonwealth Fund, writes about the cost of new targeted medical therapeutics. He sees the advantages of these new treatments but warns that, "the prospect of spending so much on a single agent for a single condition has galvanized concern over future drug costs. That concern is justified. Historically, increasing pharmaceutical expenditures have helped drive up overall health care costs."
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Jun
16
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Some people complain about the price of these drugs. Had I lived in the UK in 2009, I would have been denied access to this treatment due to its cost. But I’m living proof of their value, and I’d like to see these novel therapies inducted into their own Hall of Fame.
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Jun
06
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I just returned to New York from Chicago after attending the 50th annual American Society of Clinical Oncology convention. During this meeting there were numerous presentations of academic papers, continuing education sessions for membership and panel discussions that dealt with current and future issues in health care.
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May
23
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Every time I go to see my oncologist for my monthly white blood cell transfusion, I reflect on the time and effort that my doctors put in on my behalf so that I could survive my difficult battle with multiple myeloma in 2009.
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May
13
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Pricey new medications are often blamed for the rising costs of health care in the United States. But this criticism doesn't take into account the big picture of health care spending -- these new, better medicines, in fact, often reduce other medical expenses. I know first-hand about the value of these new medications.
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May
01
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Every year, more than 22,000 people in the United States are diagnosed with multiple myeloma, the second-most common type of blood cancer. In 2009, I became one of them. Back then, less than half of patients with myeloma – which causes bone pain, fractures, and anemia – lived five years or more following their diagnoses. Thanks in large part to advanced new oral therapies, I'm still here five years later, and my cancer is even in remission.
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